A Recommended Article on the Lack of Christian Thought

Thanks to Alex at The Pedestrian Christian blog I have spent several hours over the last two days reading articles at Paul’s Passing Thoughts blog. There is one article in particular at Paul’s Passing Thoughts that has caused me to think very hard about how Christians interact with the fallen world around us (I suspect that Paul Dohse, the author, would be happy to hear that).

Before I provide a link to the article I want to give you a little background as to why this is important to me. I grew up in Colorado and all of my family still live there. When a monster commits an act like the recent movie theater massacre it always bothers me but when it happens at “home” my stress level increases dramatically. Add to this the Columbine shootings of fifteen years ago and President Reagan’s would be assassin being from Colorado and it seems like Colorado has had more than its “fair share” of wackos.

What is going on here and how should a Christian engage others on such issues? Paul Dohse has a thought provoking article on the topic which I recommend. Even if the movie massacre doesn’t hit home to you there will be, sooner or later, some incident that will. You will be best served if you start thinking about it now so you will be prepared. Here is a quote from “Recent Movie Theater Massacre Further Reveals Christian Sloth” which I recommend highly:

And the reason is Christian sloth, primarily in the area of THINKING. American Christianity has become a flock of lazy thinkers. We like our Christianity easy, and mindless, and are willing to endure the misery that comes with it. Sound bites, clichés, and truisms long ago replaced Christ’s exhortation to seek with all of our heart, soul, and mind. In the recent TANC conference on Gospel Discernment and Spiritual Tyranny, John Immel got it right: “thinking is hard” and “ideas are hard” and Christians are up to neither. This is why we prefer things that are EASY. Thinking is hard. And the Colorado massacre reveals such.

I am not going to cite specific examples, but the Christian articles going viral on the internet are the ones offering the pat answers and borrowing sound bites from the world; for example, calling the massacre a “senseless act.” No it wasn’t. The act was masterfully planned. When the goal of the individual is considered, the act makes perfect sense and again, was very well planned. Like the world, Christians continue to call such well-planned actions “senseless”—because that’s easy and we don’t have to make sense of it—that’s hard.

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6 Comments on “A Recommended Article on the Lack of Christian Thought”

  1. reyjacobs Says:

    The lack of thinking is the result of lack of ‘catholicity’ (the allowance for differences of opinion in Christianity). After the Reformation the attitude has simply been “If I disagree with my church on just one point, I leave and start a new church.” The result is a bunch of churches where nobody thinks because they don’t encounter differences in their ‘happy’ fruitopia. Thinking requires encountering something new to think about. They live in ‘blissful’ stupidity believing they are justified by blind faith, so why should they think? Thinking will inevitably lead to trusting in their works, or thinking they should live morally or something.

    Furthemore, phrasal vocabulary is formed by reading, or used to be when people read. Prior to the Reformation and even during it Christians read not just the Bible but also the Apocrypha (it was part of the Bible then) and the church fathers. This wide reading gave them ready made phrases to use. Today, Christians barely even read the Bible without the apocrypha, and since their days are widdled away working for the man in our modern industrialized society they works themselves to death all day long, then come home and watch the hour or so of nightly new and get all their phrasal vocabulary from there. If the news media says “it was a senseless act” that’s exactly what they will say too. We human being parrot what is written for us to say. If we don’t get that from smart people like Jesus the son of Sirach, then we’ll get it from idiots like Dan Rather.

  2. Glenn Says:

    Hello reyjacobs,

    You make some interesting points but I will have to respectfully disagree. There certainly are many different churches and creeds out there but if a person is mentally lazy it is usually easier to just “go with the flow” and ignore the differences. To stay in a church where you disagree with the church about one point may or may not be the thing to do. If it is a minor point of doctrine then stay but if it is a major point, like the way of salvation, then the person should definitely get out and never look back.

    I have heard the “blind faith” accusation made before and I just don’t believe it. I don’t believe that there is such a thing. No one ever believes in Christ “blindly,” scripture never tells us to believe blindly either. It is a hypothetical that is useful for polemics but it doesn’t happen in the real world.

    Prior to the reformation the average Christian did not read a Bible, the apocrypha, or the church fathers. Some Catholic priests did but that is as far as it went. The typical Christian was illiterate and the Catholic mass was in Latin. The RC Church had inserted itself between the laity and God and it was the sole arbiter between the two. Having the people in the pews learn the Bible would cause bad things to happen like reformations.

    In the old days when the RC Church ruled supreme there was an enforced conformity but not true unity. I actually don’t want to sit in the pew next to someone who doesn’t believe a word that comes out of the pastor’s mouth. Let us who truly believe have true fellowship while the others can do what they will.

    Glenn

    • reyjacobs Says:

      Concerning blind faith I was referring to blind faith in the dogmas of a particular denomination not blind faith in Christ, which leads to a sort of view of justification by blind faith in justification by faith alone.

      “Prior to the reformation the average Christian did not read a Bible, the apocrypha, or the church fathers. Some Catholic priests did but that is as far as it went. The typical Christian was illiterate and the Catholic mass was in Latin. The RC Church had inserted itself between the laity and God and it was the sole arbiter between the two.”

      So nothing has really changed as the average Christian still doesn’t read anything but only listens to their “pastor,” meaning the only thing that changed is one set of clergy was switched out for another.

      • Glenn Says:

        Hi reyjacobs,

        I have never seen a solid case made that a majority of Christians have ever been interested in learning the deeper teachings of Christianity. However there are always a few, a remnant if you will, that is interested.

        I do believe that many pastors encourage their congregations to just take their teachings at face value and leave it at that. If you don’t want to think, and the pastor reinforces that, you probably aren’t going to think. That may be a bit cynical but it is probably true.

        Glenn

    • reyjacobs Says:

      “To stay in a church where you disagree with the church about one point may or may not be the thing to do. If it is a minor point of doctrine then stay but if it is a major point, like the way of salvation, then the person should definitely get out and never look back.”

      But what if you can’t find a church that does agree?

      • Glenn Says:

        Hello Again reyjacobs,

        There is always one recourse that all Christians have available to them. Ask God to provide you with a church that teaches the truth. It probably won’t happen overnight but you might just be surprised what will happen.

        I can be a bit cynical when it comes to people but I am not cynical when it comes to God.

        Glenn


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